I am thrilled to have three images included in this exciting campaign.  See them at the Creative Action Network and spread the #voteourplanet word.

The Whale:

“With the most massive brains on the planet, whales are also the largest creatures that have ever lived. They have been swimming in earth’s oceans for over 40 million years. These highly social and sophisticated communicators roam through every one of the world’s oceans, which cover over 70 percent of the earth’s surface. Whales and oceans: big, old stuff. If we could comprehend their language, what would these tremendous, ancient creatures be telling us? 

Historically the human whale relationship has been layered, tangled and circuitous. Our reliance on whale oil (energy) and excessive resource consumption brought numerous species to the brink of extinction. But the 1946 the International Whaling Commission created conservation protections (hunting limits) that have allowed successful regeneration of many species. While, not all was solved, (whale populations continue to be endangered) if we could hear the lyrics, the whale song just might remind us that through conservation, creative alternatives to energy and sustainable stewardship of our resources, we can make a difference. Vote our planet.” –Britt

Creative Action Network

blog

I hope each of us asks this question often: what is environmental impact?  And what is my environmental impact? Sometimes, my subjects are endangered species and extinction. Sometimes they are about climate change. Sometimes I focus my gaze on bees or social (in)equality and education. And sometimes environmental impact is, intimately, about the landscapes of internal darkness, that which is hidden underneath: vulnerability, fragility, fear, trauma, uncertainty, loss, humanity, courage, connection and love—of place, of animals, of self, of people we care about.   Environmental impact is melting icecaps and hugging a tender-hearted, teary child.  Environmental impact is prioritizing the people you love with kisses and fat hugs and prioritizing voting and recycling and consuming conscientiously.  Environmental impact is renewable energy: the sun, wind and water.  ALSO RENEWABLE ENERGY is: love, laughter, inclusion, compassion and education. 

06/05/2018

As a contemporary painter focused on environmental impact, endangered species and social equality issues, I am interested in the social impact of art.  Art inspires, and cultivates innovation and science.  And, circuitously, science and innovation inspire art.  As we build our future it is essential that we design from a foundation where compassion, science, innovation and art intersect.  Why art? Our attraction to beauty is part of our humanity.  It connects us.  Beauty can restore dignity and hope.  Art has the power to unite.  When wielded well, art reaches inside, beyond words or explanations or cerebral data points. Inside, felt by the gut or the heart,beauty reaches beyond race or gender or socioeconomics or orientation or religion or politics.  From a visceral, emotional place, art inspires people to care. Only when people care, when they feel emotionally connected, are they compelled to question, to learn, to grow, to change, to take action. 

12/11/2017

“What if sex was holy and war was obscene.  And it wasn’t twisted, what a wonderful dream” – Alicia Keys, Holy War.  In a time of warring ideas, sexism, racism, fascism, ism, ism, ism… in a time of historical mass exodus, the ever present threat of nuclear war, the temperamental wrath of climate change and extensions I, like so many, wonder what the heck is the antidote, the ballast? When I talk or write about my paintings, from my lightly used soapbox for introverts, I fervently espouse that it is essential to compel a person to love something before they’ll risk what it takes to defend it. If you are familiar with my work, you know I’ve devoted many, many years (wearing: the Lorax superhero costume under my clothes) focusing on endangered species as well as threatened environments and beings. 
"Patagonia and the Creative Action Network aim to create a new activist collection of political protest posters to communicate Patagonia’s belief that our country’s economy, security and future are wholly dependent on a healthy environment and urging all of us to take action and vote to protect our planet. Born out of The Canary Project, CAN, and Patagonia’s Vote The Environment campaign of 2014, #voteourplanet is inviting artists & designers across the country to use their talents for our planet." - Creative Action Network read more to learn the why of the bee.
"Patagonia and the Creative Action Network aim to create a new activist collection of political protest posters to communicate Patagonia’s belief that our country’s economy, security and future are wholly dependent on a healthy environment and urging all of us to take action and vote to protect our planet. Born out of The Canary Project, CAN, and Patagonia’s Vote The Environment campaign of 2014, #voteourplanet is inviting artists & designers across the country to use their talents for our planet." - Creative Action Network click to read more about the why of the whale image.
"Patagonia and the Creative Action Network aim to create a new activist collection of political protest posters to communicate Patagonia’s belief that our country’s economy, security and future are wholly dependent on a healthy environment and urging all of us to take action and vote to protect our planet. Born out of The Canary Project, CAN, and Patagonia’s Vote The Environment campaign of 2014, #voteourplanet is inviting artists & designers across the country to use their talents for our planet." - Creative Action Network

05/26/2016

My paintings have been influenced by a lifelong fascination, awe and reverence for the natural world. Michele Corriel, Art & Architecture, 2014 wrote "[Britt Freda’s paintings] ask us to travel not only the roads we see but the ones we’ve lost along the way.”  While my subjects are rooted in realism, the closer the viewer gets one will discover my surfaces are regularly imbedded with etched words, statistics, poems, maps or seedpods. The elements that are layered between patterns of color are usually circuitously referential of environmental elements (seed pods, petals, cellular structures...).

The Whale for Patagonia and The Creative Action Network's #voteourplanet campaign

9/22/2016

I am thrilled to have three images included in this exciting campaign.  See them at the Creative Action Network and spread the #voteourplanet word.

The Whale:

“With the most massive brains on the planet, whales are also the largest creatures that have ever lived. They have been swimming in earth’s oceans for over 40 million years. These highly social and sophisticated communicators roam through every one of the world’s oceans, which cover over 70 percent of the earth’s surface. Whales and oceans: big, old stuff. If we could comprehend their language, what would these tremendous, ancient creatures be telling us? 

Historically the human whale relationship has been layered, tangled and circuitous. Our reliance on whale oil (energy) and excessive resource consumption brought numerous species to the brink of extinction. But the 1946 the International Whaling Commission created conservation protections (hunting limits) that have allowed successful regeneration of many species. While, not all was solved, (whale populations continue to be endangered) if we could hear the lyrics, the whale song just might remind us that through conservation, creative alternatives to energy and sustainable stewardship of our resources, we can make a difference. Vote our planet.” –Britt

Creative Action Network